Kiev – Arena Kiev http://arena-kiev.com/ Tue, 28 Jun 2022 03:38:29 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://arena-kiev.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/default.png Kiev – Arena Kiev http://arena-kiev.com/ 32 32 Putin’s war still shakes kyiv as Russian missile strikes bury bodies | World | New https://arena-kiev.com/putins-war-still-shakes-kyiv-as-russian-missile-strikes-bury-bodies-world-new/ Mon, 27 Jun 2022 07:45:00 +0000 https://arena-kiev.com/putins-war-still-shakes-kyiv-as-russian-missile-strikes-bury-bodies-world-new/ The weather has been warm and the parks are filled with families, friends and lovers. But just as the sun rose above the horizon yesterday, the city’s air raid sirens resumed their fateful wail and missiles began raining down on people’s homes. For the most part, citizens have learned to ignore sirens, trust their army’s […]]]>

The weather has been warm and the parks are filled with families, friends and lovers. But just as the sun rose above the horizon yesterday, the city’s air raid sirens resumed their fateful wail and missiles began raining down on people’s homes. For the most part, citizens have learned to ignore sirens, trust their army’s air defense systems, or simply get tired of running for cover.

When the siren went off near my house, I rolled over and went back to sleep.

Moments later I heard a loud explosion, jumped out onto the balcony to look for smoke, then checked my phone for information on the latest attack.

But the news comes slowly – first on social networks (sometimes with video), then on one of the news sites, and only later in an official statement from the mayor’s office and the army.

The authorities do not reveal the address of the building affected, nor even the district, for fear of “correcting” enemy fire. So, most people start texting their friends and acquaintances until the information finally leaks out by word of mouth.

For me, the clue was the neighborhood, which someone on social media took the risk of reporting. It was a place I was familiar with, having reported two previous missile strikes there, each within a five-minute walk of each other.

As I approached, I was right. A tower of white smoke guided my path. Fire trucks and ambulances greeted me, while soldiers and police blocked the road.

But finally I got there – to another charred and smoking building, rescuers digging through the rubble for bodies, reporters snapping photos of the horror – and another reminder that the war hasn’t moved. from Kyiv or elsewhere.

And probably not any time soon.

]]>
Russian missiles hit kyiv as G7 leaders announce Russian gold ban https://arena-kiev.com/russian-missiles-hit-kyiv-as-g7-leaders-announce-russian-gold-ban/ Sun, 26 Jun 2022 10:20:00 +0000 https://arena-kiev.com/russian-missiles-hit-kyiv-as-g7-leaders-announce-russian-gold-ban/ Russian missiles hit at least two residential buildings in the Ukrainian capital, as G7 leaders met in Europe to discuss new sanctions against Moscow. Several explosions rocked kyiv’s central Shevchenkivskiy district early on Sunday, causing extensive damage and a fire in a residential building, the city’s mayor, Vitali Klitschko, said on the Telegram messaging app. […]]]>

Russian missiles hit at least two residential buildings in the Ukrainian capital, as G7 leaders met in Europe to discuss new sanctions against Moscow.

Several explosions rocked kyiv’s central Shevchenkivskiy district early on Sunday, causing extensive damage and a fire in a residential building, the city’s mayor, Vitali Klitschko, said on the Telegram messaging app.

“There are people under the rubble,” Klitschko said. He said several people have already been hospitalized and residents are being rescued and evacuated from two buildings.

At least five people were injured, Ukrainian police chief Ihor Klymenko told state television. There have been no major strikes in the capital since June 5.

Ukrainian Foreign Minister Dmytro Kuleba said G7 countries must respond to new missile strikes against Ukraine on Sunday by imposing new sanctions on Russia and supplying more heavy weapons to kyiv.

G7 members confirmed a ban on Russian gold imports at the start of their three-day summit in the Bavarian Alps. The move by Britain, the United States, Japan and Canada is part of efforts to tighten sanctions against Moscow.

“The measures we announced today will strike a direct blow at the Russian oligarchs and strike at the very heart of Putin’s war machine,” British Prime Minister Boris Johnson said in a statement.

“We must deprive the Putin regime of its funding. The UK and our allies are doing just that,” Johnson added.

The British government says Russian gold exports totaled 12.6 billion pounds ($15.45 billion) last year, and wealthy Russians are buying bullion to lessen the financial impact of Western sanctions .

A senior US administration official said the G7 would make an official announcement on the gold import ban on Tuesday.

“This is a key export, an essential source of income for Russia in terms of its ability to transact with the global financial system,” the US official said.

Besides banning gold imports, G7 leaders also had “really constructive” talks on a possible price cap on Russian oil imports, according to a German government source.

This comes as Western powers grapple with several crises, including soaring inflation and energy prices. The United States, along with its European allies, has sought to shift the blame to Russia. They imposed a series of financial and energy sanctions against the Kremlin.

The main economic powers of the G7 are France, Germany, Italy, Japan, the United Kingdom and the United States. This year, Germany holds the rotating presidency of the group. The group – formerly known as the G8 – excluded Russia after the Crimean peninsula joined Russia in 2014.

This year, German Chancellor Olaf Scholz has invited Senegal, Argentina, Indonesia, India and South Africa as partner countries at the summit.

Following the conclusion of the G7 summit, the leaders of NATO’s 30 members will meet for their annual summit, which is due to be held from Wednesday to Thursday in the Spanish capital of Madrid.

]]>
RED ALERT! Russian nuclear-capable Iskander missile ‘goes haywire’ as it hits Ukraine; Kyiv reacts https://arena-kiev.com/red-alert-russian-nuclear-capable-iskander-missile-goes-haywire-as-it-hits-ukraine-kyiv-reacts/ Fri, 24 Jun 2022 03:54:57 +0000 https://arena-kiev.com/red-alert-russian-nuclear-capable-iskander-missile-goes-haywire-as-it-hits-ukraine-kyiv-reacts/ In light of Moscow’s offensive on the eastern twin cities of Severodonetsk and Lysychansk, Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky has claimed that Russia aims to “destroy” Donbass. However, the Russian people may not be immune to its missiles as it continues to shell critical Ukrainian assets. According to a Mirror report, a Russian strike went awry […]]]>

In light of Moscow’s offensive on the eastern twin cities of Severodonetsk and Lysychansk, Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky has claimed that Russia aims to “destroy” Donbass.

However, the Russian people may not be immune to its missiles as it continues to shell critical Ukrainian assets. According to a Mirror report, a Russian strike went awry when the Russian Iskander missile completely disintegrated and exploded shortly after launch.

In a video posted online, the rocket “flickers” as its engine appears to misfire, creating the impression of fireworks.

According to one account, the rocket disintegrated without the warhead exploding when the solid propellant exploded. The missile was reportedly launched from the Belgorod region towards Ukraine.

A Ukrainian channel went so far as to mock “the real technological backwardness of the Russian military-industrial complex” in the failure of the missile. He advised the Russian inhabitants of the front line to beware of their own “defenders”, attacking the invading troops.

Another local media report said, “It is possible that the emergency self-destruct system was activated due to engine failure. “In any event, it demonstrates that the Russian military is not doing as well with Iskanders as Russian propaganda claims.”

Image file: Vladimir Putin and Sergei Shoigu

Earlier, EurAsian Times reported that invading troops were using Soviet-era rockets with high payload capacity instead of modern high-precision missiles in a shift in strategy.

There has been speculation that Russia tried to salvage its expensive modern precision-guided missiles after running out of huge stocks.

During a press briefing, Yuriy Ignat, spokesman for the Air Force of the Armed Forces of Ukraine, said: “Lately, we have observed a tendency to skimp on Russia on the use of expensive missiles of high accuracy. Instead, the enemy is increasingly using old Soviet Kh-59 and Kh-22 missiles.

The disintegration of nuclear-capable Iskander does not offer a good offer for the invasion force. Russia projected the missile as a symbol of its military might in addition to the Kalibr cruise missile it fired from the Black Sea.

On June 19, the Russian Defense Ministry announced that Russian Iskander missiles had hit a tank repair plant in Kharkiv, Ukraine.

Iskander-M
File Image: The Russian Iskander-M SRBM – Wikimedia Commons

Iskander is a mobile short-range ballistic missile. Two short-range ballistic missiles are part of the Iskander road-mobile missile system, which significantly increases the firepower of missile forces.

It is possible to target each missile independently. Due to the ability to change target coordination while the missile is in flight, these missiles can hit moving targets.

The Iskander is fitted with various conventional warheads, including cluster, fuel-air explosive, bunker-busting, and electromagnetic pulse warheads. It can also carry nuclear warheads. The Iskander variant used by the Russian military is over 400 kilometers long.

Is the Battle of Donbass approaching its climax?

The conflict over the eastern cities of Severodonetsk and Lysychansk has reached a “scary climax”, according to a key adviser to the Ukrainian president, the BBC reported.

Russian forces could soon encircle the twin towns and cut them off from Ukrainian territory, according to Oleksiy Arestovych, who said “the threat of a Russian tactical victory is there, but they haven’t done it yet.”

The president himself sounded the alarm saying: “There were massive air and artillery strikes in the Donbass. The occupier’s objective is unchanged here; they want to destroy the whole Donbass step by step.

For its part, Russia had previously announced that after taking control of a district on the outskirts of the city, its offensive against Sievierodonetsk in eastern Ukraine was progressing.

Severodonetsk and Lysychansk, the last Ukrainian outposts in the Luhansk region, have recently received increased attention from Russia. Even though the Russian advance slowed due to the Ukrainian counterattack, both outposts would have been shelled daily.

Serhiy Haidai, the regional governor, said on June 23 that troops in the town of Zolote, which has been on the front line since 2014, may be forced to retreat due to the capture of two major settlements south of the towns. .

Russia also simultaneously bombed the Kharkiv region, which had been spared the attack for a time. Kyiv called the strikes a Russian plot to force Ukraine to withdraw resources from Donbass to defend Kharkiv.

It is pertinent to mention that Kharkiv was one of the first regions to be attacked by Russia. However, in recent weeks, Russia has changed its strategy to focus only on the Donbass region.

As the fighting continues unabated and endless, the future could see many new fronts open up in this war of survival.

]]>
Dancing in Kyiv – The American Conservative https://arena-kiev.com/dancing-in-kyiv-the-american-conservative/ Wed, 22 Jun 2022 04:01:00 +0000 https://arena-kiev.com/dancing-in-kyiv-the-american-conservative/ A new biography of one of Russia’s greatest choreographers says as much about the society she lived in as it does about the subject itself. A rehearsal for the ballet ‘Les Biches’ or ‘The Hinds’ with music by Francis Poulenc and choreographed by Bronislava Nijinska, at the Royal Opera House in Covent Garden, London, UK, […]]]>

A new biography of one of Russia’s greatest choreographers says as much about the society she lived in as it does about the subject itself.

A rehearsal for the ballet ‘Les Biches’ or ‘The Hinds’ with music by Francis Poulenc and choreographed by Bronislava Nijinska, at the Royal Opera House in Covent Garden, London, UK, 3 December 1964. From left, Robert Mead, Svetlana Beriosova and Keith Rosson. (Photo by Evening Standard/Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

La Nijinska: Choreographer of the Modern, by Lynn Garafola, (Oxford University Press: 2022), 688 pages.

In 1938, patron Lincoln Kirstein observed that Americans viewed all ballet as “Russian ballet” (one word), so closely that they identified the art form with nationality. Vaslav Nijinsky of the famous Ballets Russes company had captured the attention of Americans with its spectacular jumps, erotic choreography and career-ending madness. But while Nijinsky had studied classical ballet in St. Petersburg, he was born around 1889 to itinerant Polish performers 1,055 kilometers from kyiv, then part of the Russian Empire. And his lesser-known sister, Bronislava Nijinska, like him an important dancer-choreographer, worked in kyiv for most of 1915-1921, a period of both political upheaval and artistic flourishing.

Like Lynn Garafola’s new biography La Nijinska: Choreographer of the Modern clearly shows that at the beginning of the 20th century kyiv was a heterodox city that lacked the sophistication of Saint Petersburg, but not its cultural richness. Garafola, the eminent scholar of the Ballets Russescompleted his 661-page book long before Putin invaded Ukraine, and his sections describing Nijinska’s time in his capital provide an unbiased and timely historical perspective.

When the choreographer arrived there with her first husband in 1915, before the Russian Revolution, the city boasted not just “glittering monasteries atop an onion-shaped hill”, but also comfortable, modern hotels. . The Kyiv City Theater, where the couple had been hired to conduct the ballet, had been rebuilt in the style of the French Renaissance, projecting “bourgeois confidence and ease”. The couple worked in partnership, showcasing a mix of traditional Russian favorites and innovations from the Ballets Russes to the grateful public of Kyiv.

When Nijinska returned to kyiv in 1918 after an interlude in Moscow, she and the city had changed. By then Ukraine had won its independence and the Bolsheviks had usurped the Tsar. No longer an imperial outpost, the city became a hotbed of multi-ethnic creativity and modernist experimentation as various factions vied for political control. As Garafola explains, “To counterbalance the influence of Russian culture, the new government proclaimed the national-cultural autonomy of the minorities, which included Poles as well as Jews and Ukrainians.”

It proved a hospitable environment for Nijinska, who this time had come without her husband – the couple would soon be divorcing – and with a desire to realize her own choreographic vision. Over the next three years, she developed theories of movement that culminated in her enduring 1923 masterpiece, The wedding, a semi-abstract treatment of a Russian peasant wedding to music by Igor Stravinsky. But the ongoing civil war has thwarted his progress. The explosions ruined her hearing and she needed government food and firewood to get by. The Bolsheviks searched his house, “looking for weapons in his son’s cradle”. She fled to Poland via the Southern Bug River.

Much like her parents, Nijinska moved frequently to make a living in dance, eventually settling in California, where she taught leading American ballerinas such as Maria Tallchief and Allegra Kent. While Garafola meticulously chronicles her subject’s turbulent career, emphasizing her ballets, criticisms, and unstable state of mind, she downplays Nijinska’s exotic childhood and ballet training in St. Petersburg, when her close relationship with his brother Vaslav was forged. . The siblings were kindred spirits before he abandoned her, first for the Ballets Russes the impresario Serge Diaghilev, who became his mentor and lover, and later as he succumbed to an impenetrable and permanent psychosis. Garafola is probably downplaying this phase of Nijinska’s life because the choreographer herself covered it emotionally in her autobiography, First memoirs.

Published nine years after Nijinska’s death in 1972, First memoirs had a long, convoluted gestation that included major revisions by the choreographer’s daughter and others. Despite her collective authorship, Nijinska’s voice animates the work, exuding a humanity that Garafola’s scholarly approach typically lacks. More importantly, Nijinska delves into her conflicted relationship with Vaslav, who more than anyone influenced her modernist sensibilities. First memoirs shows that Nijinska is a soft-hearted but principled girl, whose emotional wounds at the hands of Vaslav and others led to the abrasive and wronged woman we know from Garafola’s book. While reading First memoirs is essential to fully understand The Nijinska.

In first memoirs, we also learned about the history of the Nijinsky family in Kyiv. Nijinska relates that when her mother appeared in a Russian opera season there as an eleven-year-old Polish orphan, the older Russian dancers tricked her into repeating obscene Russian phrases. Later, Nijinska’s parents danced together in kyiv for several seasons (when Vaslav was born), and her father returned to work there after separating from his family to live with his mistress. He tells his daughter that a pantomime he staged at the Hippodrome Palace for the benefit of the city’s firefighters was inspired by one of his youth circus performances. “You were sensational,” he praised. Nijinska clings to his words as proof that he “really cared for his kids and missed us too.”

In The Nijinska, Garafola synthesizes vast amounts of research into a readable narrative, but once again it’s Nijinska’s own voice that draws us in, this time through excerpts from her diary. The most convincing of these concerns the Russian opera singer and lothair Fyodor Chaliapin. After a handful of chaste encounters when Nijinska was a young dancer, Chaliapin became her romantic obsession for decades. When he ignores his ballet performances in Paris in 1932, she despairs: “It would have been better not to be alive.

However, Nijinska de Garafola does not reveal such inner pain to almost anyone and overwhelms herself in her creative activities. For the better part of seven years, she chose to do so in the dynamic and familiar Kyiv. “Nothing could ever replicate those terrible but immensely thrilling moments,” Garafola says. Nijinska lived to be 81 and worked until the end. Like her adopted city, she suffered deeply, but carried on.

Sharon Skele is the author of Catherine Littlefield: A Life in Dance (Oxford University Press, 2022).

]]>
Ben Stiller meets Volodymyr Zhelensky in kyiv: “You are my hero” https://arena-kiev.com/ben-stiller-meets-volodymyr-zhelensky-in-kyiv-you-are-my-hero/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 21:01:52 +0000 https://arena-kiev.com/ben-stiller-meets-volodymyr-zhelensky-in-kyiv-you-are-my-hero/ Update. Ben Stiller met with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Jelensky in kyiv on Monday. The American actor said during his visit to the President of Ukraine: “You are my hero”. For his part, Zhelensky said that Ukrainians feel his support and the whole world. “Ukrainians feel support from all over the world, including many celebrities. The […]]]>

Update. Ben Stiller met with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Jelensky in kyiv on Monday. The American actor said during his visit to the President of Ukraine: “You are my hero”. For his part, Zhelensky said that Ukrainians feel his support and the whole world.

“Ukrainians feel support from all over the world, including many celebrities. The arrival of Ben Stiller proves it again. We appreciate that you are with us in these difficult times,” Zhelensky said during the American actor’s visit to Ukraine.

Your cookie settings do not allow the content of this section to be displayed. You can update the cookie module settings directly from your browser or Here – You must accept cookies from social networks

Ben Stiller traveled to Poland and Ukraine to meet many victims of the Russian war. “The search for security is a right and it must be respected by every person,” he said.

The 56-year-old American actor arrived in Poland on Saturday and was pictured talking to staff at a warehouse where aid is stored in the southeastern town of Rzeszow, near the border with Ukraine. .

For many years, the UN. Ben Stiller, the Goodwill Ambassador of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), then traveled to Ukraine on Monday, on the occasion of the international observance of World Refugee Day.

In a video posted to his Instagram account, the American star said: “Hello, I’m Ben Stiller, I’m in Ukraine now. I met people affected by war and listened to their stories. About how this war has changed their lives.

Your cookie settings do not allow the content of this section to be displayed. You can update the cookie module settings directly from your browser or Here – You must accept cookies from social networks

“War and violence are devastating to people around the world. No one chooses to leave their home. Seeking safety is a right that must be respected by every person,” added Ben Stiller.

Since the outbreak of war in Ukraine in February, millions of Ukrainians have sought refuge in Poland.

On June 18, Ben Stiller met Ukrainian refugee Marina, who left Cargo with her three children two months ago, sources said.

Ben Stiller began working with UNHCR in 2016 and has traveled to various parts of the world with agency representatives to meet refugees in Germany, Jordan, Guatemala and Lebanon.

]]>
UK set to offer kyiv additional military training to ‘change the war equation’, says Johnson https://arena-kiev.com/uk-set-to-offer-kyiv-additional-military-training-to-change-the-war-equation-says-johnson/ Fri, 17 Jun 2022 17:27:00 +0000 https://arena-kiev.com/uk-set-to-offer-kyiv-additional-military-training-to-change-the-war-equation-says-johnson/ The UK government is poised to give Ukraine ‘strategic toughness’ by supplying the country with arms and military training in sweeping measures, British Prime Minister Boris Johnson has said during his second surprise visit to Kyiv since the start of the war. Speaking at a joint press conference with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky on Friday, […]]]>

The UK government is poised to give Ukraine ‘strategic toughness’ by supplying the country with arms and military training in sweeping measures, British Prime Minister Boris Johnson has said during his second surprise visit to Kyiv since the start of the war.

Speaking at a joint press conference with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky on Friday, Johnson confirmed that his government would offer Ukrainian forces a major training program that would have the capacity to train up to 10,000 troops every 120 days. .

“I have offered President Zelensky a major new military training program that could change the equation of this war – harnessing the most powerful of forces, Ukraine’s determination to win,” the British prime minister said.

Confirming extensive deliveries of lethal weapons to Ukraine, Johnson noted that “as Ukrainian soldiers fire British missiles to defend your nation’s sovereignty, they also do so to defend the very freedoms we take for granted.” .

Johnson’s offer of further aid to Ukraine comes as the UK grapples with a financial crisis that has left Britons facing record inflation and unemployment.

Meanwhile, Johnson has also pledged to “free the grain”, which he says is “held hostage” by Putin.

“We will do everything to continue to strengthen the diplomatic coalition of support for Ukraine around the world. We will work together to liberate the grain, as you rightly say, which is currently being held hostage by Putin, depriving people around the world of the food they need,” he said.

Earlier this month, British Defense Secretary Ben Wallace also made a secret visit to Ukraine to meet with Zelensky and Ukrainian Defense Minister Oleksii Reznikov.

According to the UK Ministry of Defence, the meetings focused on the UK continuing to provide Ukraine with “operationally effective lethal aid”.

Britain was the first European country to send lethal aid to Ukraine and has since sent military aid worth over £750million, including thousands of anti-tank missiles, air defense and armored vehicles, to Ukraine.

]]>
Germany backs EU candidate status for Ukraine – The Berlin Spectator https://arena-kiev.com/germany-backs-eu-candidate-status-for-ukraine-the-berlin-spectator/ Thu, 16 Jun 2022 15:45:21 +0000 https://arena-kiev.com/germany-backs-eu-candidate-status-for-ukraine-the-berlin-spectator/ Olaf Scholz traveled to Ukraine on Thursday, with his colleagues from France, Italy and Romania. In kyiv, the Chancellor said that the European Union must prepare. Germany wanted Ukraine to become a candidate for membership. Berlin, June 16, 2022 (The Berlin Spectator) — On Wednesday evening, Chancellor Scholz, French President Emmanuel Macron and the Italian […]]]>

Olaf Scholz traveled to Ukraine on Thursday, with his colleagues from France, Italy and Romania. In kyiv, the Chancellor said that the European Union must prepare. Germany wanted Ukraine to become a candidate for membership.

Berlin, June 16, 2022 (The Berlin Spectator) — On Wednesday evening, Chancellor Scholz, French President Emmanuel Macron and the Italian Prime Minister boarded a train at the Polish-Ukrainian border. His route and schedule have not been announced, for security reasons. Thursday morning they arrived in kyiv (Kiyv). Klaus Iohannis, the president of Romania, joined them there.

The Berlin Spectator now has a newsletter. You can register here :

Increase support

This morning, Scholz traveled to Irpin, a suburb of the Ukrainian capital. He surveyed the damage there and said the Russian military had used a lot of brutality. In the afternoon, the four visitors held a press conference with their Ukrainian colleague Volodymyr Zelenskyy.

President Macron said that Ukraine could count on the European Union. Russia’s attack would never be accepted. Support for Ukraine would increase. It was about the security of all of Europe. “Europe is by your side and will be until there is a victory,” Macron told Zelenskyy. Prime Minister Draghi said Ukraine must be able to defend itself. A lasting and just peace was needed.

“Completely unacceptable”

Olaf Scholz was the last head of government to speak at the press conference. Russia’s attack on Ukraine marked a turning point in the ages, the Chancellor said. Russia was trying to move the borders, which was completely unacceptable. “We support Ukraine financially and on a humanitarian basis.” More than 800,000 Ukrainian refugees were in Germany, 135 children from there were educated in German schools, he said.

At the moment, the Federal Republic was training Ukrainian soldiers on modern weapons systems, Scholz pointed out. An air defense system had also been promised to the country. In addition, the Chancellor mentioned an international agreement that had been concluded to provide Ukraine with rocket launchers.

Harsh reviews

Despite all its support for Ukraine, Olaf Scholz’s government has been harshly criticized for not doing enough, both in Germany and in Ukraine. A few weeks ago, demands were made that Scholz should go to Ukraine “immediately”. The Chancellor has waited, until now. First, a dispute over Germany’s former Russian policy between Kyiv and Berlin had to be resolved.

]]>
High expectations in kyiv for the arrival of Scholz https://arena-kiev.com/high-expectations-in-kyiv-for-the-arrival-of-scholz/ Tue, 14 Jun 2022 12:24:27 +0000 https://arena-kiev.com/high-expectations-in-kyiv-for-the-arrival-of-scholz/ (MENAFN) President Volodymyr Zelensky said in an interview broadcast by German media on Tuesday that German leaders should pay the economic cost of severing ties with Russia and help Ukraine regardless of Moscow’s reaction. The Ukrainian president spoke to ZDF television ahead of Chancellor Olaf Scholz’s visit to Kyiv later this month, which he is […]]]>

(MENAFN) President Volodymyr Zelensky said in an interview broadcast by German media on Tuesday that German leaders should pay the economic cost of severing ties with Russia and help Ukraine regardless of Moscow’s reaction.

The Ukrainian president spoke to ZDF television ahead of Chancellor Olaf Scholz’s visit to Kyiv later this month, which he is expected to make alongside the French and Italian presidents. Scholz was pressured by Zelensky to express unequivocal support for kyiv’s aspirations to join the European Union.

The Ukrainian leader said: “I expect him to personally support us and say that he is convinced that Ukraine can join the EU and that it will be granted candidate status as early as June.”

MENAFN14062022000045014146ID1104372455


Legal disclaimer: MENAFN provides the information “as is” without warranty of any kind. We assume no responsibility for the accuracy, content, images, videos, licensing, completeness, legality or reliability of any information in this article. If you have any complaints or copyright issues related to this article, please contact the provider above.

]]>
Ukraine Sievierodonetsk blocked “de facto” by Russian forces https://arena-kiev.com/ukraine-sievierodonetsk-blocked-de-facto-by-russian-forces/ Mon, 13 Jun 2022 08:06:50 +0000 https://arena-kiev.com/ukraine-sievierodonetsk-blocked-de-facto-by-russian-forces/ Meanwhile, Kremlin-backed officials in occupied southern Ukraine are beginning to issue Russian passports to residents as Moscow seeks to consolidate its authority over captured parts of the country amid its military offensive – which is now now on its 110th day. Zelenskyy said the latest fighting in Sievierodonetsk was “very fierce”, adding that Russia was […]]]>

Meanwhile, Kremlin-backed officials in occupied southern Ukraine are beginning to issue Russian passports to residents as Moscow seeks to consolidate its authority over captured parts of the country amid its military offensive – which is now now on its 110th day.

Zelenskyy said the latest fighting in Sievierodonetsk was “very fierce”, adding that Russia was deploying under-trained troops and using its young men as “cannon fodder”. (AFP)

Monday, June 13, 2022

Sievierodonetsk ‘de facto’ blocked after Russian forces blew up ‘last’ bridge

Ukraine’s main industrial city of Sievierodonetsk was “de facto” blocked after Russian forces blew up the “last” bridge connecting it to its twin city Lysychansk, said Eduard Basurin, a representative of pro-Russian separatists .

“The Ukrainian units that are there, they are there forever. They have two options: surrender or die,” Basurin said. The towns of Sievierodonetsk and Lysychansk, separated by a river, have been targeted for weeks as the last areas still under Ukrainian control in the eastern region of Luhansk.

Taking Sievierodonetsk would pave the way for Moscow to another major city, Kramatorsk, in their moves to conquer the entire Donbass region, a predominantly Russian-speaking region partly held by pro-Russian separatists since 2014.

Both sides use heavier weapons in Ukrainian conflict (Finnish President)

Finnish President Sauli Niinisto has said both sides in the Ukrainian conflict are using heavier weapons, including, in Russia’s case, thermobaric bombs.

“We are supporting Ukraine with increasingly heavy weapons. And on the other hand, Russia has also started using very powerful weapons, thermobaric bombs which are in fact weapons of mass destruction,” Niinisto said. during security policy talks at his summer residence in Naantali, Finland.

UN rights chief warns of global food, fuel and financial crises

Highlighting the horrors and risks of the conflict in Ukraine, the UN human rights chief warned of the global food, fuel and financial crises that risk plunging millions of people into food insecurity and poverty.

Speaking at the opening session of the 50th Human Rights Council, Michèle Bachelet said: “The war in Ukraine continues to destroy the lives of many people, causing havoc and destruction.

She said the social, economic and political ramifications of the conflict reverberate in the region around Ukraine and around the world, “with no end in sight”.

Three killed in artillery attack on Donetsk market

At least three people, including a child, were killed and four injured by Ukrainian artillery at a market in Ukraine’s breakaway Russian-backed Donetsk region, the provincial news agency said.

The Donetsk News Agency showed images of burning stalls at the Maisky Central Market and at least one body on the ground.

The news agency said 155mm caliber artillery rounds meeting NATO standards hit parts of the area.

Ukrainian forces pushed back from the center of Sievierodonetsk: Kyiv

Ukraine said its forces had been pushed back from the center of the eastern city of Sievierodonetsk, where fighting with Russia had been raging for weeks.

“The enemy, with artillery support, carried out assault operations in the city of Sievierodonetsk, had partial success, pushed our units from the city center,” the Ukrainian military said on Facebook. .

Ukrainian miner Ferrexpo cuts production

Ukrainian miner Ferrexpo Plc said it was cutting its iron ore output after a haul road in the country’s southwest was damaged due to the country’s ongoing conflict, impacting on the group’s exports to European customers.

The Swiss-based company and the world’s third-largest exporter of iron ore pellets also said it was in advanced talks with other Central European port operators for seaborne exports, with Ukraine’s Black Sea ports remaining. closed.

The London-listed group added that the additional damage caused by the conflict had reduced its ability to use its barge operations, which accounted for 0.8 million tonnes of iron ore deliveries in 2021.

Odessa region in southern Ukraine begins 2022 grain harvest

Farmers in the Odessa region of southern Ukraine have started the 2022 grain harvest taking advantage of favorable weather conditions, regional officials said.

Ukraine has already completed the 2022 grain planting, but the agriculture ministry gave no outlook for the 2022 grain harvest. The ministry said farmers planned to plant 14.2 million hectares of spring cereals this year, compared to 16.9 million hectares in 2021 due to the conflict.

Odessa regional administration said local farmers have started threshing winter barley and growers will harvest a total of 1.06 million hectares of early grain, including 244,000 hectares of barley of winter. Farmers will also harvest 551,000 hectares of winter wheat.

Ukrainian and Russian forces fight for ‘every meter’ in Sievierodonetsk

Ukrainian and Russian forces are fighting “literally every yard” in Sievierodonetsk, President Volodymyr Zelenskyy said, as fighting intensified in an eastern region where the country’s commander-in-chief said the land “was covered in blood”.

Sievierodonetsk and the nearby town of Lysychansk have been targeted for weeks as the last areas of the Luhansk region still under Ukrainian control.

Russia’s massive artillery in this region has given it a tenfold advantage, said Valeriy Zaluzhny, commander-in-chief of the Ukrainian army. But, “despite everything, we continue to occupy positions”, he said.

Russia gains $98 billion from fuel exports in 100 days of Ukraine conflict: report

Russia earned $98 billion (93 billion euros) from fossil fuel exports in Ukraine’s first 100 days, with most going to the European Union, according to a research report.

The report by the Finland-based Independent Research Center for Energy and Clean Air (CREA) comes as kyiv urges the West to cut off all trade with Russia in hopes of cutting the financial lifeline of the Kremlin.

According to the report, the EU absorbed 61% of Russian fossil fuel exports during the period, worth around $60 billion (€57 billion). The main importers were China with 13.22 dollars (12.6 billion euros), Germany with 12.7 billion dollars (12.1 billion euros) and Italy with 8.2 dollars ( 7.8 billion euros).

Amnesty accuses Russia of ‘war crimes’ in Kharkiv, killing hundreds

Amnesty International has accused Russia of “war crimes” in Ukraine, saying attacks on Kharkiv, mostly using banned cluster bombs, killed hundreds of civilians.

“The repeated shelling of residential areas of Kharkiv are indiscriminate attacks that have killed and injured hundreds of civilians, and as such constitute war crimes,” the rights group said in a report on the second most major city in Ukraine.

“This is true both for strikes carried out using cluster munitions and for those carried out using other types of unguided rockets and unguided artillery shells,” he said. he said, adding, “The continued use of such imprecise explosive weapons in populated civilian areas, knowing that they repeatedly cause large numbers of civilian casualties, may even amount to directing attacks against the civilian population.”

For live updates from Sunday, June 12, click here

Source: TRTWorld and agencies

]]>
Ukraine Latest: Von der Leyen meets Zelenskiy in kyiv on EU bid https://arena-kiev.com/ukraine-latest-von-der-leyen-meets-zelenskiy-in-kyiv-on-eu-bid/ Sat, 11 Jun 2022 13:24:34 +0000 https://arena-kiev.com/ukraine-latest-von-der-leyen-meets-zelenskiy-in-kyiv-on-eu-bid/ (Bloomberg) — European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen paid an unannounced visit to Kyiv, where she spoke with President Volodymyr Zelenskiy about the country’s application to join the European Union and its reconstruction after the war. Meanwhile, Ukraine said its partners had ignored its call for pre-emptive sanctions that could have persuaded Russia to […]]]>

(Bloomberg) — European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen paid an unannounced visit to Kyiv, where she spoke with President Volodymyr Zelenskiy about the country’s application to join the European Union and its reconstruction after the war.

Meanwhile, Ukraine said its partners had ignored its call for pre-emptive sanctions that could have persuaded Russia to withdraw its troops by February 24. The comment from Zelenskiy’s office was a response to US President Joe Biden saying the Ukrainian leader brushed off his warnings of an imminent invasion.

(See RSAN on the Bloomberg Terminal for the Russian sanctions dashboard.)

Key developments

  • Von der Leyen visits Kyiv ahead of key week for Ukraine’s EU bid
  • Biden says Zelenskiy brushed off Russian invasion warnings
  • Iran has lessons from Russia’s grim survival under sanctions
  • Ukraine seeks new IMF deal to shore up war-torn finances
  • Russia cuts rates to pre-war level as it keeps an eye on the ruble and the economy
  • Chef José Andrés warns that US food aid to Ukraine will go to waste

(every hour CET)

Von der Leyen visits Kyiv as part of Ukraine’s EU bid (2:03 p.m.)

The EU chief executive made her second visit to Kyiv since the start of the war and met with Zelenskiy. She said officials were working day and night on Ukraine’s bid to join the European Union.

The European Commission is expected to recommend on June 17 that Ukraine be granted candidate status to join the bloc, beginning a process that could last more than a decade in which the country must adopt EU rules and standards.

“We will take stock of the joint work needed for reconstruction and the progress Ukraine has made as it continues its European path,” von der Leyen said ahead of the visit. “This will feed into our assessment, which we will present soon.”

Ukraine Intensifies Diplomatic Relations (12:32 p.m.)

Ukrainian Foreign Minister Dmytro Kuleba tweeted that he had a call with his Polish counterpart Zbigniew Rau to discuss upcoming heavy weapons deliveries and the EU’s seventh sanctions package against Russia. Defense Minister Oleksii Reznikov met with British Defense Secretary Ben Wallace and had a “productive and frank discussion”. Meanwhile, Ukrainian lawmaker Fedir Venislavskyi said the country was taking all necessary steps to save the two Britons and a Moroccan man captured by Russia and sentenced to death, according to the Guardian, citing Reuters.

Ukraine open to prisoner swap for Brits, Telegraph says (9:19 a.m.)

Ukraine is open to a prisoner swap to secure the release of two British men who have been sentenced to death, The Telegraph reported, citing Vadym Prystaiko, Ukraine’s ambassador to the UK. The two men, who have lived in Ukraine for several years, were serving Ukrainian military personnel. The UK is keen to avoid treating their capture as a bilateral issue, the Telegraph said.

US and Ukraine engage in war of words over invasion warning (9:17 a.m.)

Biden said Zelenskiy ignored warnings that Russia would invade Ukraine ahead of the February attack.

“I know a lot of people thought maybe I was exaggerating, but I knew, and we had data to back it up, that he was coming in through the border. There was no doubt. And Zelenskiy didn’t want to hear it, and neither did a lot of people,” Biden said on Friday. The president acknowledged that the possibility of Russian President Vladimir Putin launching a full-scale invasion might seem far-fetched at the time.

Zelenskiy’s spokesman, Serhiy Nikiforov, said the Ukrainian president had several calls with Biden before the invasion where the two leaders shared their assessments of the situation. In addition, Zelenskiy had called on the country’s partners to prepare preventive sanctions to push Russia to de-escalate, but “our partners did not want to hear us”.

More children die in Mariupol (9:09)

The Prosecutor General of Ukraine has learned of the deaths of 24 other children in Mariupol, reports the Guardian. This means that at least 287 children have died so far in the war, while 492 have been injured, the newspaper said, citing a statement from the attorney general’s office.

“These figures are not final, as work is underway to establish them in places of active hostilities, in temporarily occupied and liberated territories,” the statement said.

BASF CEO Fights for Tech Sanctions (9:00 a.m.)

The CEO of BASF SE, which is expected to close its main site in Ludwigshafen if Russian gas supplies are cut off, said he was instead in favor of sanctions against the tech industry. Restrictions on aircraft spare parts, semiconductors or software updates would have a much bigger impact on Russia than a possible gas embargo, Martin Brudermueller said in an interview with Sueddeutsche Zeitung.

Japan Says Sino-Russian Ties Could Deepen (4:20 a.m.)

Japanese Defense Minister Nobuo Kishi said ties between Moscow and Beijing could deepen further as Russia comes under intense international sanctions. Joint military activities by the two countries are also of concern, he said at the IISS Shangri-La dialogue in Singapore.

©2022 Bloomberg LP

]]>