Kiev Economy – Arena Kiev http://arena-kiev.com/ Wed, 29 Jun 2022 11:15:42 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://arena-kiev.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/default.png Kiev Economy – Arena Kiev http://arena-kiev.com/ 32 32 New U.S. anti-Russia sanctions break rules of the game for all economies: Envoy – Reuters https://arena-kiev.com/new-u-s-anti-russia-sanctions-break-rules-of-the-game-for-all-economies-envoy-reuters/ Wed, 29 Jun 2022 06:57:00 +0000 https://arena-kiev.com/new-u-s-anti-russia-sanctions-break-rules-of-the-game-for-all-economies-envoy-reuters/ “Markets see the US government acting unpredictably, creating chaos and panic,” he said, responding to a media question about the new anti-Russian sanctions package, TASS reported. “The new barriers that affect, among others, gold and industrial exports, violate the existing rules of the game for all economies.” In his words, “the decision of the United […]]]>

“Markets see the US government acting unpredictably, creating chaos and panic,” he said, responding to a media question about the new anti-Russian sanctions package, TASS reported.

“The new barriers that affect, among others, gold and industrial exports, violate the existing rules of the game for all economies.”

In his words, “the decision of the United States and its allies to forge tough economic ties with Russia has pushed existing crisis tendencies in the global economy to a climax.” The Russian diplomat added that the United States was also suffering from its own sanctions.

“Consumer price growth here has been the highest in 40 years,” he said.

The recent wave of anti-Russian restrictions from the West imposed on the special military operation in Ukraine has exacerbated the global food crisis, Antonov said.

“With regard to food security, it was the wave of anti-Russian restrictions, imposed by the Western collective led by the United States, that spurred the global food crisis. Its root causes are incompetent macroeconomic measures taken by a number of developed countries, climate change and the COVID-19 pandemic,” the embassy’s press service quoted the ambassador as saying.

According to the diplomat, the crisis can only be resolved “through free access of cereals and fertilizers, including Russian ones, to world markets”, he said.

On February 24, Russian President Vladimir Putin launched what Russia calls a “special military operation” in Ukraine in response to a request from the leaders of the two Donbas republics. The Russian leader stressed that Moscow has no intention of occupying Ukrainian territories.

The West responded with sweeping sanctions against Russia. In addition, Western countries have so far supplied billions of dollars worth of weapons and military equipment to Kyiv. Some Western politicians have acknowledged that an economic war is being waged against Russia. Putin said in March that the West’s sanctions policy against Moscow showed all the signs of aggression, with Russian containment a long-term strategy.

He also noted that the problems in the global food market started in February 2020. Putin dismissed claims that Russia blocked grain in Ukrainian ports as a simple bluff.

]]>
Russia expels 8 Greek diplomats and asks them to ‘leave the country’ https://arena-kiev.com/russia-expels-8-greek-diplomats-and-asks-them-to-leave-the-country/ Mon, 27 Jun 2022 18:48:57 +0000 https://arena-kiev.com/russia-expels-8-greek-diplomats-and-asks-them-to-leave-the-country/ Petro Andriushchenko, adviser to the mayor of Mariupol, said more than 100 bodies of people killed in Russian shelling were found under the rubble of a building in the temporarily occupied region of Mariupol, Ukrinform reported. The corpses were found under the rubble of a house hit by an airstrike in Lioberezhny district during the […]]]>

Petro Andriushchenko, adviser to the mayor of Mariupol, said more than 100 bodies of people killed in Russian shelling were found under the rubble of a building in the temporarily occupied region of Mariupol, Ukrinform reported. The corpses were found under the rubble of a house hit by an airstrike in Lioberezhny district during the inspection. Petro Andriushchenko’s statement comes as the war between Russia and Ukraine continues into Day 124.

“During the inspection of buildings in the Lioberezhny district in the house hit by an air bomb at the intersection of Victory Avenue and Blvd, more than 100 bodies were found. The bodies are still under the rubble. The occupants do not plan to bury them,” Petro Andriushchenko said in a post on Telegram.

In the statement posted on Telegram, Petro Andriushchenko said the exhumation was continuing and added that priority was given to schoolyards and kindergartens. Mariupol Mayor Vadym Boichenko said around 22,000 civilians have been killed since the invasion began on February 24. According to the Ukrinform report, more than 95% of all buildings, including 1,356 high-rise buildings, were destroyed due to Russian bombings in Mariupol.

]]>
Neocon Think Tanks Steer Biden’s Ukraine Policy https://arena-kiev.com/neocon-think-tanks-steer-bidens-ukraine-policy/ Wed, 22 Jun 2022 06:20:00 +0000 https://arena-kiev.com/neocon-think-tanks-steer-bidens-ukraine-policy/ In Joe Biden’s Washington, it’s the self-proclaimed national security “community of experts” that drives and directs the administration’s Ukraine policy. A little note open letter which appeared in the Washington tabloid The Hill on June 1 put a public face on what had hitherto been a low-key, but highly successful effort by Washington think tanks […]]]>

In Joe Biden’s Washington, it’s the self-proclaimed national security “community of experts” that drives and directs the administration’s Ukraine policy.

A little note open letter which appeared in the Washington tabloid The Hill on June 1 put a public face on what had hitherto been a low-key, but highly successful effort by Washington think tanks – many of them, like the Disgraced Brookings Institutionare funded by foreign governments – to direct White House policy on Ukraine.

The letter says, in part:

]]>
Ukraine strikes oil rigs in Crimea, fires reported https://arena-kiev.com/ukraine-strikes-oil-rigs-in-crimea-fires-reported/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 13:04:55 +0000 https://arena-kiev.com/ukraine-strikes-oil-rigs-in-crimea-fires-reported/ Ukraine predicts Russia will step up its attacks this week as EU leaders consider backing kyiv’s bid to join the bloc and Moscow continues its campaign – now in its 117th day – to take control from the east of the country. Meanwhile, explosions rocked the city of Odessa in southern Ukraine, but no details […]]]>

Ukraine predicts Russia will step up its attacks this week as EU leaders consider backing kyiv’s bid to join the bloc and Moscow continues its campaign – now in its 117th day – to take control from the east of the country.

Meanwhile, explosions rocked the city of Odessa in southern Ukraine, but no details were immediately available. (AFP)

Monday, June 20, 2022

Ukraine strikes oil rigs in Crimea: pro-Russian regional chief

Ukrainian forces attacked Black Sea drilling rigs owned by a Crimean oil and gas company, the annexed peninsula’s pro-Russian leader said, without giving details of the weapons used.

Three people were injured and a search was underway for seven workers at the Chernomorneftegaz energy company, Sergei Askyonov, the Russia-backed Crimea chief, said in a message on Telegram.

Crimean officials said work on three drilling rigs was suspended after the hit, and fires were reported.

Explosions heard in Ukrainian city of Odessa, authorities say

Explosions rocked the southern Ukrainian city of Odessa, a spokesman for the regional administration said.

The spokesman said he could not provide any details of the explosions, which were heard after the air raid sirens went off.

The Kremlin blames the gas crisis on Europe’s doorstep

The Kremlin said Europe was solely responsible for the gas market crisis and demanded the return of gas turbines used by the Nord Stream 1 gas pipeline.

Russian state-controlled gas company Gazprom cut capacity along Nord Stream 1 last week, citing the delayed return of equipment currently serviced by Germany’s Siemens Energy to Canada. Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov told reporters that Russia had gas to supply but the equipment had to be returned first, adding that the recent crisis was of a “man-made” nature created by Europe.

“Russia remains the most reliable supplier. From a technical point of view, the mechanical infrastructure of this pipeline is under EU sanctions,” Peskov said. “We have gas, it is ready to be delivered, but the Europeans must return the equipment, which must be repaired as part of their obligations.”

“Russia has no right to threaten Lithuania”, according to Ukraine

Ukrainian Foreign Minister Dmytro Kuleba has slammed Russia after accusing Lithuania of imposing trade restrictions on the transit of EU-sanctioned goods to the Moscow enclave of Kaliningrad.

“Russia has no right to threaten Lithuania. Moscow only has to deal with the consequences of its unprovoked and unjustified invasion of Ukraine,” Kuleba wrote in a statement on social media. .

Ukraine bans and seizes pro-Kremlin party assets

A Ukrainian court has banned the country’s largest pro-Russian political party and seized its assets across the country after the group was accused of undermining the country’s sovereignty.

The move comes after President Volodymyr Zelensky signed a decree in March banning the work of several parties identified by the security services as being pro-Moscow. An appeals court “has banned the activities of the political party Opposition Platform – For Life,” Ukrainian Justice Minister Denys Malyuska said in a statement on social media.

“The court decided to transfer all property, funds and other assets of the party to state ownership,” he added.

Russian blockade of Ukrainian grain exports a real war crime, says EU’s top diplomat

Russia’s blocking of the export of millions of tonnes of Ukrainian grain is a real war crime, said EU foreign policy chief Josep Borrell.

“We call on Russia to unblock the (Ukrainian) ports… It is inconceivable, one cannot imagine that millions of tons of wheat remain blocked in Ukraine while in the rest of the world people are suffering from hunger” , he told reporters.

“It’s a real war crime, so I can’t imagine it will last any longer,” he said as he arrived for a meeting of European Union foreign ministers in Luxembourg.

EU foreign ministers discuss Ukraine’s EU membership and food security

The meeting of EU foreign ministers has started in Luxembourg.

Following the European Commission’s recommendation issued last week, EU leaders are expected to assess whether to grant EU candidate status to Ukraine and Moldova at their 23 and June 24.

“The discussion will mainly focus on Ukraine’s application for EU membership since the leaders have to take a historic decision which also signals our values,” French Foreign Minister Catherine Colonna told reporters on her way to the meeting.

Ukraine claims to have lost control of the village of Sievierodonetsk

Ukraine said it lost control of a village adjacent to the eastern industrial city of Sievierodonetsk, at the center of weeks of fierce fighting with Russian troops.

“Unfortunately, we no longer control Metyolkine. And the enemy continues to build up its reserves,” Lugansk regional governor Sergiy Gaiday said in a statement on social media.

Germany says working with Poland and Romania to release blocked Ukrainian grain

Germany is supporting Poland and Romania in adapting their railways to allow the export of millions of tonnes of grain blocked in Ukraine due to a Russian maritime blockade, German Foreign Minister Annalena has said. Baerbock.

“The railways need to be upgraded, we need the right freight carriages – the German government is working on this together with many other players,” she said as she arrived for a meeting with her European Union counterparts in Luxemburg.

“It is clear that in the end we will certainly not be able to get all the grain out, but if we manage to even get some of it out, on different routes, it will help us as we face this global challenge.”

Russia replaces Saudi Arabia as China’s top crude oil supplier

China’s crude oil imports from Russia soared 55% from a year earlier to a record high in May, overtaking Saudi Arabia as the top supplier as refiners took advantage of cut-price supplies as part of the sanctions imposed on Moscow for its offensive in Ukraine.

Russian oil imports, including supplies pumped through the Eastern Siberian pipeline into the Pacific Ocean and sea shipments from Russian ports in Europe and the Far East, totaled nearly $8.42 million. tons, according to data from the General Administration of China Customs.

That equates to around 1.98 million barrels per day (bpd) and up a quarter from 1.59 million bpd in April.

Influx of Ukrainian refugees could ease labor shortages in eurozone: ECB

The influx of Ukrainian refugees into the European Union could gradually ease labor shortages in the eurozone as some of those fleeing the conflict are expected to settle permanently, the European Central Bank has said.

“Under all assumptions detailed so far, the back-of-an-envelope calculations point to a median increase of between 0.2% and 0.8% in the euro area labor force over the medium term,” the statement said. ECB in an article in the Economic Bulletin. .

“This corresponds to an increase of between 0.3 and 1.3 million in the size of the eurozone labor force following the Ukrainian refugee crisis,” he added.

Zelenskyy warns of Russian ‘hostile activities’

Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy has warned that Russia risks intensifying its “hostile activity” this week, as kyiv awaits a landmark decision from the European Union on its membership application.

Nearly three months after Russia launched a bloody assault on her country, Zelenskyy said there have been “few decisions as fatal to Ukraine” as the one she expects from the EU this week, adding in his speech that “only a positive decision is in the interests of all of Europe.”

“Obviously, we expect Russia to intensify its hostile activities this week… We are preparing. We are ready,” he continued.

For live updates from Sunday, June 19, click here

Source: TRTWorld and agencies

]]>
Boris Johnson meets Ukrainian Volodymyr Zelensky in Kyiv https://arena-kiev.com/boris-johnson-meets-ukrainian-volodymyr-zelensky-in-kyiv/ Sat, 18 Jun 2022 07:00:38 +0000 https://arena-kiev.com/boris-johnson-meets-ukrainian-volodymyr-zelensky-in-kyiv/ Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky met with visiting British Prime Minister Boris Johnson to discuss defense and security issues, the presidential press service said. In particular, Zelensky and Johnson discussed in detail the current situation on the front line in eastern and southern Ukraine as well as arms supplies, Xinhua news agency reported. “We talked about […]]]>

Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky met with visiting British Prime Minister Boris Johnson to discuss defense and security issues, the presidential press service said.

In particular, Zelensky and Johnson discussed in detail the current situation on the front line in eastern and southern Ukraine as well as arms supplies, Xinhua news agency reported.

“We talked about the need to increase the supply of heavy weapons. The main thing today is to also provide air defense to Ukraine. We have started to move in this direction,” Zelensky told reporters after the talks.

For his part, Johnson said his country was ready to continue supplying weapons to Ukraine and conducting military training for its use.

In addition, the parties discussed security guarantees for Ukraine and efforts to clear Ukrainian territory from landmines.

Other key topics of conversation were financial and economic support for kyiv, the blockade of Ukrainian ports, as well as efforts to resolve the energy crisis in Ukraine.

Johnson arrived in kyiv earlier in the day for his second visit since the start of the Russian-Ukrainian conflict. Earlier, the British Prime Minister visited the Ukrainian capital on April 9.

(To receive our daily E-paper on WhatsApp, please Click here. To receive it on Telegram, please Click here. We allow the PDF of the document to be shared on WhatsApp and other social media platforms.)


]]>
Western leaders promise weapons and EU path to Ukraine during visit to Kyiv https://arena-kiev.com/western-leaders-promise-weapons-and-eu-path-to-ukraine-during-visit-to-kyiv/ Thu, 16 Jun 2022 14:55:00 +0000 https://arena-kiev.com/western-leaders-promise-weapons-and-eu-path-to-ukraine-during-visit-to-kyiv/ Four European Union leaders have said they support accelerating Ukraine’s bid for formal membership in the bloc. It came as the leaders of France, Germany, Italy and Romania traveled to Kyiv on Thursday. French President Emmanuel Macron told a press conference that the leaders “are doing everything so that only Ukraine […]]]>


Four European Union leaders have said they support accelerating Ukraine’s bid for formal membership in the bloc.

It came as the leaders of France, Germany, Italy and Romania traveled to Kyiv on Thursday.

French President Emmanuel Macron told a press conference that the leaders “are doing everything so that only Ukraine can decide its fate.

Macron also promised six more powerful truck-mounted artillery guns.

(Only the title and image of this report may have been edited by Business Standard staff; the rest of the content is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

Dear reader,

Business Standard has always endeavored to provide up-to-date information and commentary on developments that matter to you and that have wider political and economic implications for the country and the world. Your constant encouragement and feedback on how to improve our offering has only strengthened our resolve and commitment to these ideals. Even in these challenging times stemming from Covid-19, we remain committed to keeping you informed and updated with credible news, authoritative opinions and incisive commentary on relevant topical issues.
However, we have a request.

As we battle the economic impact of the pandemic, we need your support even more so that we can continue to bring you more great content. Our subscription model has received an encouraging response from many of you who have subscribed to our online content. More subscription to our online content can only help us achieve the goals of bringing you even better and more relevant content. We believe in free, fair and credible journalism. Your support through more subscriptions can help us practice the journalism we are committed to.

Support quality journalism and subscribe to Business Standard.

digital editor

]]>
NATO-Russia war ignites conflict between Turkey and Greece https://arena-kiev.com/nato-russia-war-ignites-conflict-between-turkey-and-greece/ Tue, 14 Jun 2022 21:42:32 +0000 https://arena-kiev.com/nato-russia-war-ignites-conflict-between-turkey-and-greece/ Amid the ongoing US-NATO war against Russia in Ukraine, tensions are dangerously rising between NATO member states Turkey and Greece in the Aegean Sea. The two countries stage war games against each other, accusing each other of disregarding international treaties and violating each other’s borders with fighter jets and warships. Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan […]]]>

Amid the ongoing US-NATO war against Russia in Ukraine, tensions are dangerously rising between NATO member states Turkey and Greece in the Aegean Sea. The two countries stage war games against each other, accusing each other of disregarding international treaties and violating each other’s borders with fighter jets and warships.

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan watches fighter jets pass by during the final day of military exercises taking place in Seferihisar near Izmir, on Turkey’s Aegean coast, Thursday, June 9, 2022. (Turkish Presidency via AP )

The Turkish Armed Forces (TSK) Ephesus-2022 exercise, held in the Aegean Sea and involving more than 10,000 military personnel, ended last week. Thirty-seven countries, including the United States and Italy, participated in air, sea and land exercises. Held in Seferihisar, just 1.5 kilometers from the neighboring Greek island of Samos in the Aegean Sea, the exercise was based on the scenario of a “military landing on an island”. He was widely treated in the Turkish capitalist media as a threat against Greece.

Greek media reported that during the Greek naval exercise Storm 2022, which ended on May 27, Turkey sent “two F-16 fighter jets that violated Greek airspace, reaching only two 2 .5 nautical miles from the northern port city of Alexandroupoli”.

During the Ephesus-2022 exercise, Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan accused Greece of arming the Aegean islands in violation of international agreements. He warned Athens “one last time” about this: “We call on Greece to stop arming the islands that have a non-military status and to act in accordance with international agreements. I’m not kidding, I’m serious.

Threatening to militarize the Turkish islands if necessary to threaten Greece, Erdoğan said: “We again warn Greece to avoid dreams, statements and actions that will lead to regrets, just as they did there. a century”, a reference to the Turkish War of Independence against the British-backed Greek invasion in 1919-1922.

A week ago, Turkish Foreign Minister Mevlut Çavuşoğlu accused Greece of violating its peace treaties with Turkey: “But what is another reason for Greece to be aggressive? The violation by Greece of the status of the islands granted to it in the Treaty of Lausanne of 1923 and the Treaty of Paris of 1947 under the condition of not arming them [Greek islands in the Aegean Sea]and our evocation of this violation within the framework of international law.

]]>
Ex-Diplomat – The New Indian Express https://arena-kiev.com/ex-diplomat-the-new-indian-express/ Mon, 13 Jun 2022 00:44:00 +0000 https://arena-kiev.com/ex-diplomat-the-new-indian-express/ Express press service BENGALURU: Social cohesion and coexistence are the only means by which India, a multicultural, multi-faith and multi-linguistic society, can develop as a nation. Responding to international backlash and protests in the country over remarks on Prophet Mohammed by former BJP spokesman Nupur Sharma and Delhi media chief Naveen Jindal, former deputy national […]]]>

Express press service

BENGALURU: Social cohesion and coexistence are the only means by which India, a multicultural, multi-faith and multi-linguistic society, can develop as a nation. Responding to international backlash and protests in the country over remarks on Prophet Mohammed by former BJP spokesman Nupur Sharma and Delhi media chief Naveen Jindal, former deputy national security adviser Pankaj Saran told the New Indian Express that more than the reactions of Islamic countries against the remarks, which were “episodic”, the broader and long-term issue is of “social cohesion in India and is of concern”.

“There are over 20 million Muslims in the country. They are Indian citizens, whatever they say. Their future is in the countryside. No outside country can solve their problems. It is the duty of the central government and the states to reach out to Muslims and their enlightened leaders and ensure that they are the equal beneficiaries of education, vocational training, employment and other government policies. It is also the responsibility of community leaders to ensure that Muslims have greater public participation and do not play the victim card,” the former diplomat said.

He added that Prime Minister Narendra Modi has said repeatedly and on multiple platforms that he represents more than 1.35 billion Indians.

“The country must meet the expectations of young people”

“State governments cannot wash their hands of their responsibilities and duties to their people. Many issues are local in nature and providing education, job training, food, shelter and health care to its people is the responsibility of states,” he added. On the hijab line, which started in Karnataka, Saran said the Center is looking at IFP’s role, funding and external links.

“The PFI has no positive agenda and is fishing in troubled waters,” he said. “Radicalization is a problem. Deradicalization and capacity building are the two important objectives of our national security policy. He added that India being a democracy, people have the right to freedom of expression. “People have the right to free speech as long as they don’t violate the Constitution and the fundamental rights of other citizens.

Today, there is greater articulation of political opinion on both sides of the divide. The role of media, visual and social, is vital and often the source of the problem. Advanced democracies like the United States and European countries face the same problem. We are not as mature as these countries and need more awareness. In a country the size of India, we have to create our own models to protect and promote our security. Look at our economic growth and the opportunities that have grown through reforms,” he said.

“Most importantly, the country must meet the expectations and aspirations of young India. The challenge of finding jobs and qualifying them are at the heart of the problems,” he added. On the Ukraine conflict, Saran, who was India’s former diplomat to Russia, said it was a “classic case of failed diplomacy. Both parties should be blamed. The issue cannot be resolved without a diplomatic settlement.

The world is looking for leadership. The UN has failed to resolve this problem, which is leading to a major global food and energy crisis. This is a historic opportunity for the United States to broker a settlement between Moscow and Kyiv, but it does not appear that the Biden administration is ready to play that role.” Saran said India’s position on the Ukraine conflict was “excellent”.

No strategy expert or opposition leader has criticized the government’s handling of the geopolitics of the Ukrainian conflict. The government will have to deal with the economic fallout from the conflict, and we have told the West that buying fuel from Russia trumps any other geopolitical concerns, Saran said.

Regarding the targeted assassinations in Jammu and Kashmir (J&K) and threats against India by Al-Qaeda in the Indian Subcontinent (AQIS), he said it was a “proxy of the Pakistani ISI. Pakistan is in a critical phase and is yet another example of a failed alliance with China after Sri Lanka, which is facing economic collapse. The belief that China offers solutions to benevolent parties will peel off.”

]]>
Russia stands for equality, respect for all states https://arena-kiev.com/russia-stands-for-equality-respect-for-all-states/ Sat, 11 Jun 2022 09:27:38 +0000 https://arena-kiev.com/russia-stands-for-equality-respect-for-all-states/ Lately it has become a habit to accuse Russia and only Russia of unprovoked and premeditated aggression. I would like to recall that Russia was forced to launch a military operation in response to a call for help from the people of Donbass, after eight years of genocide and violation of their legal rights, in […]]]>

Lately it has become a habit to accuse Russia and only Russia of unprovoked and premeditated aggression. I would like to recall that Russia was forced to launch a military operation in response to a call for help from the people of Donbass, after eight years of genocide and violation of their legal rights, in the face of the unconditional refusal of the Ukrainian government to fulfill its international obligations. The objective of the operation is to neutralize the neo-Nazi armed formations and to destroy military targets. At the same time, Russia has delivered more than 21,500 tons of humanitarian aid to Ukraine and since 2014 has received more than 2.5 million refugees from its territory.

You don’t have to be an expert to see that the Ukrainian AFU’s tactic is urban warfare, using the civilian population as a human shield, shooting at those who try to escape through the humanitarian corridors, causing a maximum destruction and casualties among the civilian population, and then blame Russia for this devastation. However, apparently funding for the restoration has been pledged to Kyiv by its allies, possibly even using Russian sovereign assets in the most trusted banks.

– Advertising –

These facts do not seem abnormal to those who today impose sanctions against Russia and sign anti-Russian articles, just as they were not bothered by the bombings and invasions against Korea and China (1950- 1953), Guatemala (1954, 1960, 1967- 1969), Indonesia (1958), Cuba (1959-1961), Congo (1964), Laos (1964-1973), Vietnam (1961-1973), Cambodia (1969- 1970), Grenada (1983), Lebanon (1983-1984), Libya (1986), El Salvador and Nicaragua (1980s), Iran (1987), Panama (1989), Iraq (1991, 2003-2015), Kuwait ( 1991), Somalia (1993, 2007-2008, 2011), Bosnia (1994-1995), Sudan (1998), Afghanistan (1998, 2001-2015), Yugoslavia (1999), Yemen (2002, 2011, 2015), Pakistan (2007-2015), Libya (2011, 2015), Syria (2014-2015). It is best not to mention who is responsible for the only nuclear weapon attack in history, against the peaceful cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

The number of civilian casualties as a result of all these violent actions is ignored, as well as the 14,000 deaths in Ukraine since 2014. Now no one is surprised that a certain group of countries is called the whole of international community, arrogating to itself the right to the truth, the right to execute and to pardon, to accuse the president of a sovereign state of war crimes without impartial investigation by authoritative bodies. The country, which is behind the charges, is not even required to be a member of the International Criminal Court.

It is even becoming fashionable to blame Russia for worsening the energy and food crisis, when in reality it is the maniacal desire to stifle the Russian economy with sanctions that has led to the collapse transport and financial chains, from which the developing world suffers first and foremost, not the sanctioners. And instead of promoting development goals, they allocate funds to kyiv for the purchase of Russian armaments from third countries, violating the basic rules of export control and arms trafficking. It is claimed that for Russia, supposedly, there are no security threats, NATO is a defensive alliance. Just look at the map and see the encirclement created by NATO military units on Russia’s borders. None of this is observed from a distance at the borders of the United States or its allies. We can no longer normalize a world of double standards. We stand for equality and respect for all states.

– Advertising –

Advertising

]]>
Adding up the global costs of Putin’s war https://arena-kiev.com/adding-up-the-global-costs-of-putins-war/ Thu, 09 Jun 2022 20:05:26 +0000 https://arena-kiev.com/adding-up-the-global-costs-of-putins-war/ The death, destruction and disruption caused by Russia’s war in Ukraine suggests that the short-term savings made by reducing defense capabilities in peacetime can lead to huge longer-term costs. The cost of investing in military capabilities to deter coercive authoritarian regimes could be much cheaper than the cost of war. While the invasion has cost […]]]>

The death, destruction and disruption caused by Russia’s war in Ukraine suggests that the short-term savings made by reducing defense capabilities in peacetime can lead to huge longer-term costs. The cost of investing in military capabilities to deter coercive authoritarian regimes could be much cheaper than the cost of war.

While the invasion has cost Ukraine dearly in human, economic and physical terms, Russia, too, is taking a heavy toll, likely in ways that President Vladimir Putin did not anticipate. Europe will have to bear higher energy costs for some time. Around the world, food insecurity will be exacerbated for those least able to manage it, which could lead to political instability.

It is difficult to know what level of European defense spending could have deterred Putin, and military equipment alone is not enough. Equally important is the resolve and willingness to use these abilities.

The greatest cost to Ukraine is the loss of life caused by the Russian invasion. Civilian and military losses entail substantial intangible and financial costs.

Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky provided a figure of 2,500 to 3,000 military dead as of mid-April. For the same period, US intelligence agencies estimated that between 5,500 and 11,000 Ukrainian soldiers had died, with more than 18,000 injured. The Russian estimate of the number of Ukrainians killed in action was over 23,000 in mid-April. Estimates of civilian deaths also vary. The UN gave a figure of 3,930 as of May 23, but said it believed the number was much higher. The mayor of Mariupol said more than 10,000 civilians had died there by mid-April.

As of May 23, more than 7 million out of 41.9 million Ukrainians were refugees in other countries, while 7.1 million people were internally displaced. This disruption and the destruction of major infrastructure has generated considerable shortages of food, water and electricity throughout the country.

Ukraine’s economy has been hit hard by the conflict and mass exodus. The World Bank projects a 45% contraction in GDP this year, based on collapsing investment, mass displacement, blockages of shipments, falling exports and imports, loss of income and loss of equipment.

Reconstruction will put a strain on Ukraine’s post-war economy. The Kyiv School of Economics economic calculations show that it suffers an estimated $4.5 billion in civilian infrastructure damage every week. Zelensky spoke of a $600 billion reconstruction bill may’s beginning.

The dire situation will not only affect Ukraine, but also the countries caring for its refugees. Poland estimates the cost of hosting 3.5 million refugees this year at 24 billion euros. The Economist’s Intelligence Unit estimates that supporting 5 million refugees could cost Europe around €50 billion in 2022.

Ukraine’s May 29 estimate of the Russian death toll was 30,000. Moscow gave a figure of 1,351 as of March 25. British estimates of Russian military dead on 23 May suggest 15,000. The number of seriously wounded is likely to be at least double the number killed in action.

Pentagon estimates as of May 26, calculate that Russia had lost about 1,000 tanks, 350 artillery pieces, 36 fighter-bombers and more than 50 helicopters.

The World Bank predicts that sanctions and the cost of wartime operations will cause Russia’s real GDP growth to decline by 11.2% this year and inflation to jump from 6.7% to 22% .

In response to the sanctions, Russia has banned certain exports, seized foreign businesses and assets such as aircraft, and prevented foreign investors from selling their shares. But nationalizing foreign companies won’t necessarily keep them in business, seizing planes won’t keep Russia’s aircraft industry flying, and spare parts from the US and EU are under sanction. . The ruble initially depreciated by 30% against most major currencies. It recovered thanks to the action of the Russian central bank and measures such as the obligation for foreign buyers of Russian oil and gas to pay in rubles. However, a strong ruble is not useful if there is nothing to buy with it.

Russia is the world’s second largest crude oil exporter after Saudi Arabia, and it continues to rake in oil and gas revenues for now, helping to fund its war effort. Western European customers are looking to diversify away from Russian energy imports, either to other suppliers or to renewables, and many plan to ban or at least limit their energy imports Russians as soon as possible.

The Kiel Institute for the World Economy traced at least 64.6 billion euros in 37 government-to-government commitments to Ukraine from January 24 to May 10 this year, of which the United States provides more than 65%. At least 25 countries provide military equipment. International assistance includes goods and money to help with military logistics, refugee support and settlement, energy resources, economic offers, medical equipment, emergency services equipment and other humanitarian goods. Australia provided $285 million in military and humanitarian aid.

Military supplies changed from shoulder-fired missiles to long-range weapons such as 155 millimeter howitzers and armored vehicles. Javelin anti-tank missiles cost $178,000 each.

Ukraine’s supply revealed the meager stocks of modern equipment in many European countries. Many provided weapons that are no longer used on the front line, and some were unusable.

Even the United States will have to restart or expand its own production lines, especially for its low-stock and older items. This is a major problem, as the United States has donated about a third of its javelin stockpile (about 7,000 javelins). Current production rates are low and it will take years to replenish stocks.

While the Western military has no troops in Ukraine, they support Ukrainian forces, including providing intelligence, which adds to the higher cost of the surveillance aircraft effort.

It is clear that Putin did not feel discouraged by the military might of NATO. This failure of deterrence is, in part, a consequence of the fact that many NATO states are enjoying post-Cold War peace dividends. This, combined with an unwillingness to take Russian revisionism at face value and an overreliance on US taxpayers to foot the security bill, was the root of past low military spending. Many NATO members pledged in 2006 to devote 2% of their GDP to military spending, but they did not succeed. NATO reaffirmed the 2% benchmark in 2014 after Russia annexed Crimea, but only three members reached it.

Russia’s invasion of Ukraine prompted many NATO countries to promise substantial increases in military spending.

Japan is also likely to increase its defense budget, a trajectory that predated the invasion of Ukraine but was arguably reinforced by it.

Disruption to trade caused by fighting, sanctions and Russia’s blockade of Ukraine’s Black Sea export routes continues to generate significant flow costs around the world. World Bank data from April indicates that Thailand, Vietnam and low-income countries saw some of the steepest declines due to their dependence on imported energy for key sectors, while that major net exporters of crops or energy, such as Nigeria, experienced export surges. .

The Russian occupation of Ukrainian ports and the blockade of Ukrainian shipping have a dramatic impact on world food prices. The surges are mainly a response to the void left by reduced Russian and Ukrainian exports, which previously accounted for nearly 25% of global wheat exports and 15% of corn and fertilizer exports. Wheat prices jumped 40%. Many countries have sought to secure their own food supplies. India, for example, banned wheat exports in mid-May, citing concerns about heat waves reducing stocks and the war in Ukraine raising domestic prices.

The war and resulting policies potentially created the conditions for significant political and social instability. The price hike mainly affects food importers such as Somalia, which bought 90% of its wheat from Ukraine and Russia.

Price hikes have driven the global food crisis to famine levels. Before the conflict in Ukraine, many low-income countries were already at risk of famine due to war, extreme weather conditions in Africa, high livestock prices, increased food demand after Covid-19 and global supply chain disruptions. Just before the war, the UN estimated that more than 140 million people were suffering from acute hunger and in urgent need of food aid.

The disruption of the interconnected global economy also affects commodity and metal prices. Russia is a major exporter of aluminum, iron, steel, copper and nickel. While some can be purchased elsewhere, war is likely to cause substantial cost increases and disruptions.

The impact of the war on production and the sanctions against Russian crude oil, petroleum products and gas generated a massive increase in energy prices. Europe was the hardest hit as it depended on Russia for 35% of its natural gas, 20% of its crude oil and 40% of its coal, but developing economies were also hard hit.

In Australia, the average retail petrol price reached 182.4 cents per liter at the end of February, the highest inflation-adjusted price since 2014. Average prices in Australia’s five largest cities reached nearly 215 cents per liter in mid-March.

As a major exporter of energy and food, Australia can help fill the gaps in Ukrainian and Russian production and benefit from higher commodity prices. Australian government forecasters expect commodity exports to hit $424.9 billion for the fiscal year to June 30, up a third from 2020-21 profits. This growth will likely be driven by higher iron ore prices, which have risen from projections of US$118 per tonne to US$160 in 2022. Forecasters also expect liquefied natural gas export revenues to nearly double. , rising from $32 billion in 2020–21 to over $70 billion in 2021–22, while the average price of coking coal is expected to rise from US$123 per ton in 2020–21 to US$348 in 2021 –22.

]]>